A brief guide to Beijing's best Indian restaurants

Where to get kickin' curries and more at Beijing's best Indian restaurants

China may be the most populous country in the world, with some seriously good national cuisine, but number two has plenty to bring to the table. When it comes to vibrant spices and seriously, actually, vegetarian cuisine (FYI pork fat doesn’t qualify as a vegetarian-friendly seasoning) it’s hard to beat the subcontinent. While Indian food in Beijing tends to be both pricey and lazy, there are still some top-notch dishes to be had. Here’s our guide to the city’s best Indian spots.
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Indian Kitchen (印度小厨)

Indian Kitchen has long been a popular destination for Sanlitun diplomats keen on taking advantage of the reasonable lunch buffet (68RMB) and spacious group seating. One of the larger Indian options, it can definitely take a crowd, and very often does at lunch. Their house-blended masala is a balanced sweet and spicy affair that does the trick.

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2 Sanlitun Beixiaojie (Chaoyang, Chaoyang)

Ganges (恒河印度餐厅)

For when delivery just wont cut it and a rich vindaloo is what you’re chasing, Ganges has your number. With the most locations citywide, you’re never too far from a Ganges. The bargain basement pricing on the lunch set (58RMB) makes us wonder about the a la carte pricing, but so does every Indian lunch buffet, if we’re honest. For staple fare and consistency, Ganges is always there for you.

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9 Guanghua Lu (Chaoyang, Chaoyang)

Santoor

One of the only Indian options in the city’s old neighbourhood, Santoor has what is easily the most charming environment for treats from the subcontinent, not to mention our favourite selection of naan (from 18RMB) and parata (20RMB). Clean, quaint and wellpriced, even for Beiluoguxiang, Santoor receives our highest praise for depth of flavour and freshness.

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12 Ju'er Hutong Nanluoguxiang

Punjabi Indian Restaurant (本杰比)

A mainstay of bold spices and bright flavours amid Lucky Street’s subdued Japanese eateries and whisky bars, Punjabi is a relative oasis. The second floor locale and rinky-dink décor make for an odd evening, but smouldering heat tempered with pints of Jing A (40RMB) are a nice change from bottles of Kingfisher.

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C-8 Lucky Street (Chaoyang, Chaoyang)

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