50 things to do in Beijing: shopping

Check out the local markets and independent boutiques of Beijing

Whether you're after a tacky souvenir or a high-end piece of cutting-edge fashion, or anything in between, Beijing is your city. As well as most of the international brands you can think of, Beijing's independent boutiques really stand out from the crowd, often featuring local designers. If you're after something a bit more rough n' ready, head to the markets and get ready to browse and barter.
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Get tailor-made clothes

Get tailor-made clothes

The good bit: tailored clothes in China are supposed to be two things – high in quality and low in price. So, if you've been on the look-out for a stylish suit made-to-measure, then track down a tailor during your stay.
The not-so-good bit: not all tailors deliver the high quality that they will (undoubtedly) offer. Have a flick through our handy guide for some hints and tips on what to look out for, to make sure you get yourself a suit that measures up to your expectations.

Pick up some market knick-knacks

Pick up some market knick-knacks

If you're a sucker for antiques, Panjiayuan Antique Market is definitely worth a visit. Fondly known as the 'Dirt Market', it is the biggest and best known antique market in the city. Admittedly, a lot of the antiques are fake nowadays, but it is still the perfect place to pick up souvenirs and presents for the whole family. You can find all sorts of bits and bobs: from Buddha heads, to revolutionary memorabilia and everything in between.

Check out some local boutiques

Check out some local boutiques

Beijing's boutiques are the perfect places to get a real feel for the city's fashion and design scene. Why not step off the high street and discover Beijing's signature style? Check out our insider tips to the city's best boutiques.

Get a hutong haircut

Get a hutong haircut

Image credit: Jing A Brewing

Hair salons are everywhere in this city. The most common variety is the glitzy, glammed-out beauty parlours showcasing baby-faced stylists with show-stopping, Korean-inspired haircuts. On the other end of the spectrum are the pavement barbers. These tradesmen set up stools and mirrors in hutongs and on quiet streets to trim their trade. If you’re not so precious about your locks, you can cop a haircut for 5RMB. Even if you are, live on the edge – it grows back.

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